History of Street Names

St.  Catherine:  It is believed that the Soeurs de la
Congregation owned a convent on the mountain and
the street that led to it was called St. Catherine.

Guy: Named on August 30, 1817 after Etienne Guy,
notary, who gave the city the land for the street.

Dorchester: Named before 1844 for Guy Carleton,
Lord Dorchester (1724-1808) Governor-General of
Canada from 1768-1778 and 1786-1795.
Named Rene-Levesque in 1994 after Rene Levesque,
Premier of Quebec.

du Fort: Named before 1880 by the Sulpicians
because it led to the fort which the Sulpicians had
built on the mountain.

Tupper: Named on July 2, 1873 for Sir Charles
Tupper (1821-1915) doctor, minister and Prime
Minister of Canada in 1896 and leader of the
Conservative party from 1896 to 1900. Before 1900,
this street, west of du Fort, was named Quiblier.

St. Marc: Named on May 17,  1880 after one of the
Evangelists.  Land for this street was given by the
Sulpicians.

St. Mathieu: Named on May 17, 1880 after one of the
Evangelists.  Land for this street was given by the
Sulpicians.

Baile: First named Bayle (later changed to Baile) on
May 17, 1880 after J. Alexander Bayle (1801-1888)
a Sulpician Superior from March 14, 1866 to April
20, 1881.

Lamben-Closse: Named Closse, later changed to
Lambert-Closse, on May 17, 1880 for Raphael
Lambert-Closse, major, notary and intermediate
Governor of Montreal in 1665.

Seymour: Named on March 22,1889 for
Mr. and Mrs. Melancthon Hiram Seymour, who gave
the city the land for the street.

Home
From a map c.1880
Sussex: Named after a county in England.

Hope: Named after John Hope who owned land on
Dorchester Boulevard.
Shaughnessy  Village got its name from Shaughnessy House built in 1874 to the design of
William T. Thomas for tycoon Thomas Shaughnessy, the president of the Canadian Pacific Railroad.
The house was declared a national historic site in 1974 and became incorporated into the
Canadian Centre for Architecture, one of the world's foremost centres of architectural history.